Conditional Clauses Speaking Activities For Adults

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Model a few sentences on the board: When/whenever I get hiccups, I ask a friend to scare me. Tell students that this is called the zero conditional. Give out the first page of the handout and go over it quickly. We use the zero conditional to talk about general or scientific truths and habits. If you heat ice, it melts. (General truth) If I drink coffee after 6pm, I can’t sleep. (Habit) We also use it to talk about what people should do in certain situations.

If you feel tired, stop for a rest. If you feel ill, take your medicine. The formula is: If/when/whenever + present simple, present simple. Matching exercise Match numbers 1-5 with letters a-e to make zero conditional sentences. If it rains, a.

The present downloadable printable is intended for high school students and adults at Advanced (C1) and Proficient (C2) level. It is a useful material for consolidating Conditionals in English, and is excellent for enhancing your groups' Speaking skills. Copyright License: This file is licensed by hfclaurab under the. First conditional Bingo. Language focus First conditional (if + present simple + future simple) Skills focus Speaking, listening Preparation.

The roads are dangerous. If it snows, b.

I try a new flavour of ice-cream 3. Whenever I visit Rome, c.

Tell a security guard. If you see someone stealing d. When water reaches 100º C, e. We play basketball inside. Matching Key 1-e, 2-a, 3-b, 4-c, 5-d Conversation exercise Cut the following cards up.

Students take them one at a time and discuss them in conversation.

1 A Present Situation That is Possible Wishes are great context for practicing the conditional. Remind students that when using wish, the is used to represent a present situation. With that in mind, have your students do a genie in the bottle role play to practice. Have one person play the genie who starts by saying, “ I will grant you three wishes.” The other person then makes a wish using the conditional form of the verb. For example, he might say, “ I wish I had a puppy.” The genie answers, “Your wish is my command.” Once the person has made all three wishes, have your students reverse roles and repeat the role play. 2 A Future Situation That is Possible If clauses are another natural context for practicing the conditional tense in English.

For an if clause discussing a future situation, the verb is in the. Ask your students to imagine their lives five or ten years from now. What would they like their lives to look like? Have your students write 10 sentences about their futures starting with an if clause. For example, someone may write “ If I work in the United States in fifteen years, I will live in New York City.” Remind your students, too, to place a comma after the first clause in each sentence.

4 A Future Situation That is Unlikely or Impossible Worst case scenarios can range from outrageous to probable, and in his book The Worst Case Scenario Survival Handbook, Joshua Piven give the reader plenty to think about. If you are able to get a copy of the book, use these situations to practice using conditional statements for future unlikely events, or come up with some worst case scenarios of your own. Give each student one of the scenarios to read about.

In each segment, Piven compiles advice on how to overcome the worst case scenario. Your students will read his advice and then determine how to write the same information in a conditional statement. She will then share her advice with the rest of the class. For example, if she reads about being trapped in quicksand, she might say, “ If you are trapped in quicksand, you should try and float on your back.” In this case, the if clause should be in the present tense and the main clause should use should with the main verb. 5 Something That is Always True If Something Happens As different as your students might be, they do have one thing in common: they are learners of English.

Have your students tap into that experience by writing a brochure to future students of English. In the brochure, your students should give advice to the reader in an imperative statement and follow it with the reason for the advice. They should use the conditional to express results that are always true when a student performs a certain action. For example, your students might advise their readers to speak with native speakers every day, and they would follow that advice with this explanation. “ When a student speaks with native speakers every day, he or she has better pronunciation.” In a sentence with this structure, both verbs are in the.

6 Something That Would Have Been True in the Past If Something Had Happened Give your students a chance to get to know one another better while they practice the conditional by sharing stories of their past. In pairs, have one student share something that happened to him at some time in the past, for example, that he got an A on an exam. Then have the second student ask a question beginning with “ what if” and using the conditional form of the verb to pose an alternative past. For example, the second student might ask, “ What if you had not studied?” The first student would then answer with a conditional statement. “ I would have failed.” For a past situation that might have been true, the verb in the first clause should use the and the verb in the second clause should use would have plus the past participle form of the verb.

It is easy to get confused in a foreign language when you are talking about things that may or may not be or have been, but that is why it is important to review the conditional with your students. These activities are not for beginning level students, but by the time you are ready to teach and review the conditional with your students, they will be well suited to these activities which review the conditional tense that they already know. What are your favorite activities for teaching or reviewing the conditional in English?

This will help students with the structure of using the 'if' clause to begin the sentence, for future time clauses. If we finish work early, we'll go out for a beer. When we visit our parents, we like to go to Bob's Burgers. Once students have understood this basic structural similarity, it's easy to continue on with the zero conditional, as well as the other conditional forms. It is also helpful to use other conditional names such as 'real conditional' for the first conditional, 'unreal conditional' for the second, and 'past unreal conditional' for the third conditional. I recommend introducing all three forms if students are comfortable with tenses as the similarities in structure will help them digest the information.

Here are suggestions to teaching each conditional form in order. Zero Conditional I recommend teaching this form after you have taught the first conditional. Notice how the zero conditional is used to underline that a situation does not regularly occur in the examples below. Routines We discuss sales when we meet on Fridays. When she visits her father, she always brings a cake.

Exceptional Situations If a problem occurs, we immediately send our repairman. She informs her director if she can't deal with the situation herself. First Conditional The focus in the first conditional is that it is used for realistic situations that will take place in the future. Make sure to point out that the first conditional is also called the 'real' conditional.

Here are the steps to teaching the: • Introduce the construction of the first conditional: If + present simple, (then clause) future with 'will' • Point out that the two clauses can be switched: (then clause) future with 'will' + if + present simple • Note that a comma should be used when beginning the first conditional with the 'If' clause. • To help students with the form, use a to repeat the construction. • Use a to ask students to practice the form. • Create a first conditional chain by asking each student to repeat the result of what the previous student has said in the 'if' clause. For example: If he comes, we will have lunch.

If we have lunch, we'll go to Riccardo's pizzeria. If we go to Riccardo's pizzeria, we'll see Sarah. Second Conditional Stress that the second conditional form is used to imagine a different reality. In other words, the second conditional is an 'unreal' conditional. • Introduce the construction of the second conditional: If + past simple, (then clause) would + base form of verb • Point out that the two clauses can be switched: (then clause) would + base form of verb + if + past simple • Note that a comma should be used when beginning the second conditional with the 'If' clause. • One problem with the second conditional is the use of 'were' for all subjects. Cambridge University now also accepts 'was'.

However, many academic institutions still expect 'were'. For example: If I were the teacher, I'd do more grammar.

If I was the teacher, I'd do more grammar. I recommend using your best judgment based on your students' objectives. In any case, point out the difference in common usage and academic expectations. • To help students with the form, use a second conditional grammar chant to repeat the construction.

• Use a to ask students to practice the form. • Create a second conditional chain by asking each student to repeat the result of what the previous student has said in the 'if' clause. For example: If I had $1,000,000, I'd buy a new house. If I bought a new house, I'd get a swimming pool, too. If I had a swimming pool, we'd have lots of parties. • Discuss the.

You can also use this ready to go to further help students with the two forms. • Practice the differences between the first and second conditional forms with a. Third Conditional The third conditional can be challenging for students because of the long verb string in the result clause. Practicing the form repeatedly with the and conditional chain exercise are especially useful for students when learning this complicated form. I suggest also teaching the similar form of with 'I wish I had done.' When teaching the third conditional. • Introduce the construction of the first conditional: If + past perfect, (then clause) would have + • Point out that the two clauses can be switched: (then clause) would have + past participle+ if + past perfect • Note that a comma should be used when beginning the third conditional with the 'If' clause.

• To help students with the form, use a third conditional grammar chant to repeat the construction. • Use a to ask students to practice the form. • Create a third conditional chain by asking each student to repeat the result of what the previous student has said in the 'if' clause. For example: If I had bought that car, I would have had an accident. If I had had an accident, I would have gone to the hospital.

If I had gone to the hospital, I would have had an operation. Gpsmapedit Full Crack Idm.