How To Crack Irdeto 2 Encryption Code

AES (Advanced Encryption Standard) is a public symmetric encryption algorithm. It has been proven to be secure by mathematicians all over the world for many years.

There is no self-respecting math student that has not tried to find a weakness in the algorithm during his studies at least once. A mathematical mistake in the algorithm would allow a conclusion to the plaintext from the encrypted data without trying out all possible combinations. An algorithm is seen to be secure as long as it’s public and no mathematic mistake has been found. Without a mathematic mistake in the algorithm the only way to ‘crack’ an AES encrypted data is to try all possible combinations, also known as brute-force attack.

As a very huge number of possible keys exist, the security of an algorithm is based on the time it takes to try all possible keys. A single computer is not able to brute force AES in a reasonable time and even a would not significantly reduce the time to brute force AES. But what about having 100.000 or more computers that all are used to brute force a single encryption key?

In this case every computer does not need to brute force all combinations, it only needs to brute force a part of all keys. So let’s do a theoretical calculation: How long it would take to brute force an AES256 key with lots of computers. Some organizations may have more than 100.000 computers. As we’re not in control of such a network we may use a botnet for our scenario. The biggest botnet I’ve heard about was in control of ~700.000 computers. But 700.000 are still not enough. Let’s use all devices connected to the internet.

Apr 13, 2005 Hacking Channels on Hotbird 13E and. Are encrypted to various encryption systems, for example Irdeto. Arc Machines Inc more. Hotbird and astra 19.2 degrees can.

According to Cisco, in 2015 there will be about fifteen billion devices connected to the internet and around forty billion devices by 2020. As the amount of devices will grow during our brute force attack we’re using exaggerated 300 billion devices for our calculation.

Now we’ll need to estimate how many keys a device can calculate per second. A realistic number using an up-to-date computer using GPUs instead of CPUs to run a brute force is ~100.000 keys per seconds. As devices will become faster while our brute force attack is running, we’re using again a number that is exaggerated compared to today’s hardware. We’ll use 10 million keys per second for our calculation. How much power do we get: 300,000,000,000 devices multiplied by 10.000.000 keys/s = 3.000.000.000.000.000.000 (3E+18) that’s the amount of keys all our devices can calculate every single second.

That’s quite a big number. But is this powerful enough to brute force an AES key in a reasonable time? AES 256 bit is 2 256 = 115.792.089.237.316.000.000.000.000.000.000.000.000.000.000.000.000.000.000.000.000.000.000.000.000.000 (1,15792E+77) That’s the amount of possible combinations for an AES 256 key. Now we’ll need to divide the amount of keys by the calculations we can do per second with our botnet.

This will give us the seconds it will take to try all possible combinations: 38.597.363.079.105.300.000.000.000.000.000.000.000.000.000.000.000.000.000.000 or 3,85974E+58 Translated to years: 1.254.856.009.386.230.000.000.000.000.000.000.000.000.000.000.000.000 or 1,25486E+51 We have used exaggerated amount of devices and even exaggerated the calculation power of these devices and we didn’t get even close to a reasonable calculation time. Not even with 300 billion devices! By the way the sun will be collapse in 4 billion years. Years till the sun collapse 4.000.000.000 Years of brute force 1.254.856.009.386.230.000.000.000.000.000.000.000.000.000.000.000.000 Overall it’s unlikely that an AES256 key can be brute forced forever.

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Hello everybody. I'd just see that ird2 is fully hacked on some countries of europe, as all may know, the emus are here a lot of time ago, the only we need to make this emus works is the key (I think, the RSA key) of the provider, and then the emu will do the same work the original irdeto card does. My question is, if they does hack the key from the ird2 card in these european countries, it is possible to get the key for any ird2 card, isn't it?

Does anybody knows how to take this keys from a valid subscription original ird2 card? Does anybody knows someone of these people who are cracking the subscription cards from europe, to send to them a card of other provider to hack the key and publish it?

Thanks you very much! Of course, that's what you said!! The problem is that as an example, here in south america, there are some good stb sellers that its business depends of the hackers, so, they can pay whatever the hackers wants to break some cards and then improve their STB, and sell much more, and that's an infinit cycle. The problem to IRD 2 is that nobody knows someone which them can talk to look if there is some chance of hack these cards. It's totally underground and nobody knows how to contact these people. Of course, that's what you said!! The problem is that as an example, here in south america, there are some good stb sellers that its business depends of the hackers, so, they can pay whatever the hackers wants to break some cards and then improve their STB, and sell much more, and that's an infinit cycle.

The problem to IRD 2 is that nobody knows someone which them can talk to look if there is some chance of hack these cards. It's totally underground and nobody knows how to contact these people.put an add in the paper. Hello everybody. I'd just see that ird2 is fully hacked on some countries of europe, as all may know, the emus are here a lot of time ago, the only we need to make this emus works is the key (I think, the RSA key) of the provider, and then the emu will do the same work the original irdeto card does. My question is, if they does hack the key from the ird2 card in these european countries, it is possible to get the key for any ird2 card, isn't it? Does anybody knows how to take this keys from a valid subscription original ird2 card?

Does anybody knows someone of these people who are cracking the subscription cards from europe, to send to them a card of other provider to hack the key and publish it? Thanks you very much!Mate.many of us have gone through this before starting back in the old galaxy box days. If you're doing it as a hobby, you should already have a subscription and if you dont, you're trying to rip the keys off some other persons card.

If you are a seller, i hope you get caught. Not sure what the jails are like in south America but you might need a nappy when you get out and you'll spend a lot of 'cuddly' birthdays in there.

You should already have a subscription so why do you want to take the keys off another card? Mate.many of us have gone through this before starting back in the old galaxy box days. If you're doing it as a hobby, you should already have a subscription and if you dont, you're trying to rip the keys off some other persons card. If you are a seller, i hope you get caught. Not sure what the jails are like in south America but you might need a nappy when you get out and you'll spend a lot of 'cuddly' birthdays in there. You should already have a subscription so why do you want to take the keys off another card?I'm not a seller, I'm only a hobbist as you said, that doesn't have a subscription to some services and want to investigate the form of get the working keys and make a irdeto 2 emu to work in STB.

That's the only thing I want. Since I'm not a seller, I'm not in risk of go to jail, I'm not one of these who get more and more money every day installing pirate systems. Finally, I don't know that ird2 can be 'cloned' with the keys of a working card, but I think it's possible to get the keys to make a irdeto 2 emulator work in my STB (Azbox hd), just like the Nagra2 emulators out there.

No pirate is going to just give you the key because it takes a substantial amount of time, money and expertise to retrieve it, and they can't make any money off it if it's public. The security measures used in pirate cards are every bit as rigorous as legitimate subs for that reason. If you look at some of the Euro sat forums, some of the posters seem unusually knowledgeable. I imagine it's a 'circles of privilege' thing, with privilege and trust being earnt slowly over time.Totally agree, but there are people out there that had published a lot of working keys for many ird2 providers, only looking in google will give you a lot of working keys for european services in ird2. That's because perhaps I think that there is some tool that exploits some bug, just like in ird1 which have a simple exploit to get the RSA key from a working card. I know there are techniques with electronic microscopes that are extremely expensive and nobody will do that for free, but as I said before, perhaps there are some tool that works with any card directly exploiting a bug or something like it.